2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part VII: Curriculum Development Resources

This blog contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that FEMA Higher Education Program  includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at Curriculum Development Resource considerations for two-year programs.

Curriculum Development Resources

This information was presented through a webinar engaging the SIG Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment to Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Programs on November 28, 2018. Additional resources were identified and are included in this document. Contributors to this planning resource acknowledge the wealth of curriculum development information available through the FEMA Higher Education Group, partnering colleges, associations, and other sources. A synthesized resource list has been organized into the following three categories: 1) Body of Knowledge; 2) Law, Doctrine, and Policy; and 3) Syllabi, Lesson Plans, and Assessment Tools. The Emergency Management Core Curriculum Model has been built upon and anchored to the resources below.

Body of Knowledge

Law, Doctrine, and Policy

Syllabi, Lesson Plans, and Assessment Tools

http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/senate/curriculum-review-and-approval-1/course-numbers-and-non-permanent-courses

Additional References

FEMA Emergency Management Institute, Higher Education Task Force. Associates Outcomes Task Force Report. June 2014.

Hart Research Associates. Fulfilling the American Dream: Liberal Education and the Future of Work: Selected Findings from Online Surveys of Business Executives and Hiring Managers. Association of American Colleges and Universities. July 2018, www.aacu.org/sites/default/files/files/LEAP/2018EmployerResearchReport.pdf.

This concludes our summer series discussing the Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program.    Join us to welcome students to the FCC Fall 2019 Semester!  Let’s make it a great year!!!

2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part VI: Emergency Management Core

This blog contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that FEMA Higher Education Program  includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at Emergency Management Core considerations for two-year programs.

Emergency Management Core

The Emergency Management Core Curriculum Model includes 10, three-credit courses and supports a blend of delivery modes including classroom, online, and hybrid formats.

1 (100 level) Emergency Management Framework and Principles

This course guides students to establish baseline knowledge in the emergency management framework, principles, and body of knowledge. Considering an all-hazards approach, students will learn the threat environment, phases of emergency management, varied supporting stakeholder groups, and the impact of disaster. Through an awareness of the operational environment of emergency management, students will explore proactive, anticipatory, and innovative approaches and actions to prevent, mitigate against, prepare for, respond to, and recover from actual or threatened disasters and ultimately how to promote safe and resilient communities.

2 (100 level) Disaster Environment and Planning Elements

This course guides students to describe the disaster environment and the comprehensive emergency management planning elements. Through an awareness of disaster-related data sources and collection methods, students gain an awareness of historical events, patterns, and prediction methods. Students identify the planning process, key stakeholders, and disaster intervention, preparedness, and communication strategies. The course guides students to lattice knowledge of the disaster environment and community engagement process with planning strategies to support the strategic disaster planning vision.

3 (100 level) Consequence Management

This course guides students to explore hazards, develop a risk profile, and identify potential consequences. Students gain an awareness of disaster risk identification, assessment, measurement, and reduction in an interconnected and interdependent world. An exploration of the strategies and policies to prevent new disaster risk, reduce existing disaster risk, and manage the residual disaster risk result in an awareness of loss reduction and capability and resilience building strategies.

4 (100 level) Emergency Management Law and Policy

This course introduces students to the legislative underpinnings of emergency management. Students will review select legislation with special consideration for the concepts that define legal duties, funding mechanisms, and consequences for emergency management personnel.

5 (100 level) Emergency Management Elective

A 100-level course designed to meet the needs of the community and workforce in which the college services.

6 (200 level) Sociocultural Dynamics in Emergency Management

This course guides students to examine, understand, and, where applicable, respond to disasters from an informed, sociological, cultural, and theoretical perspective. Through an exploration of disaster case studies and theoretical concepts, students will be able to apply critical thinking skills to modern social phenomena with disasters and their impact on society and its culture.

7 (200 level) Leadership in an Interconnected and Interdependent World

This course leads students to examine the complex and critical dependencies in today’s dynamic and turbulent world and the advanced leadership skills required to serve in emergency management. Students explore and discuss the moral obligations of public leadership. Using case studies, students analyze the interconnectivity of the public and private sectors, increased social dependency on technology, increased vulnerabilities of our nation, and the potential for disruption.

8 (200 level) Research and Evolving Technology in Emergency Management

This course leads students to combine emergency management scholarly research and evolving technology to enhance decision making in support of planning, mitigation, response, and recovery actions. Students discover the scholarly research process and products. Students outline the role of technology and amplify skills using current and emerging web-based products including geospatial information systems, global positioning systems, simulation and modeling software, and decision support software platforms. Through an integration activity, students move research and evidence into practice.

9 (200 level) Emergency Management Elective

A 200-level course designed to meet the needs of the community and workforce in which the college services.

10 (200 level) Internship/Apprenticeship

This course provides students with the opportunity to synthesize the knowledge attained throughout the program, apply higher-order thinking skills, produce a tangible product, and form the bridge to the next step in the learning and/or career continuum. Through the use of a variety of applied and project-based activities, worksite interface, and on-the-job training, students develop a culminating project goal, outcomes, and success metrics.

“Internships and apprenticeships stand out as the applied learning experiences most highly valued by employers” (Hart, 2018).

A special note is that not all institutions endorse internships and apprenticeships. An alternative could be a Culminating Experience allowing research, a work product, presentation, and career portfolio development activities.

Join us next week as we discuss a Curriculum Development Resources for an Emergency Management 2-Year Academic Program.  In the meantime, please enjoy our one-pager that we created.  It’s designed to help programs get started using the resource we’re discussing!  Promote2YearCritInfluencers

2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part V: General Education Curricula

This blog contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that FEMA Higher Education Program  includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at General Education Curricula considerations for two-year programs.

Curricula

Many institutions provide resources to guide programs and courses through their Curriculum Committee approval process, state higher education commission process, and regional accrediting body expectations. Be sure to consult with your academic administration regarding all of these regulations. Resources may include syllabi templates, distance education course shells, rubrics, and assessment tools. Make full use of the tools available within your institution. Be sure to ask Committee members or those at your institution with experience navigating submissions for help whenever you feel it’s needed. It’s far less painful to spend a little extra time learning your institution’s preferences and getting them under your belt for the future, than to spend that time lost in reviews and resubmissions.

Review the graduation requirements established by your institution with an emphasis on general education courses, physical education, degree credit minimums and maximums, and unique goals, such as cultural competency.

General Education

The General Education degree requirements are often designed specifically for the institution and its accrediting body. General education outcomes produce knowledge and skills that cut across majors and support both well-rounded and workplace preparedness. “The skill and knowledge areas of greatest importance to both business executives and hiring managers when hiring include oral communication, critical thinking, ethical judgment, working effectively in teams, working independently, self-motivation, written communication, and real-world application of skills and knowledge” (Hart, 2018). To promote the whole community approach and foster a shared preparedness mindset, and connect with other schools, departments, and majors, consider working with your Curriculum Committee to establish courses meeting the general education, cultural competence, and other institutional designations for graduation.

The Associates-Level Curriculum Outcomes Focus Group developed a baseline document describing the general education knowledge, skills, and abilities a two-year graduate should possess. Courses selected for this area should align with institutional, state, and accrediting body guidelines and produce individuals with the following baseline outcomes (EMI Focus Group, 2014).

Reading, Writing, and Communications

  • Possess the ability to provide organized, clear, and concise delivery of emergency management information in both the verbal and written forms.
  • Identify appropriate research sources and apply scientific methods and document work utilizing one of the style manuals.
  • Demonstrate a level of competence in the application of technology used in the workplace.

Mathematics

  • Identify and apply scientific mathematical techniques and concepts appropriate to emergency management statistical analysis, problem solving, financial management, budgeting, and risk management.

Sciences

  • Awareness of biological, physical, and environmental sciences and methodologies. (Be aware that your institution and transferring institutions may have specific course requirements for this area. Engaging your advisory committee and partnering institutions is advised.)
  • Awareness of the impact of the social and behavioral sciences, moral issues, conflicts, and the impact on emergency management in a multicultural society.

Health and Wellness

  • Awareness of and ability to apply the concepts of health and wellness in a professional setting.

Critical Thinking

  • Describes ways to modify practices when presented with new information.

Civics

  • Describe how the levels of government interface with emergency management functions before, during, and after a disaster.

 

Join us next week as we discuss a “Emergency Management Core Curriculum Model” for an Emergency Management 2-Year Academic Program.  In the meantime, please enjoy our one-pager that we created.  It’s designed to help programs get started using the resource we’re discussing!  Promote2YearCritInfluencers

2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part IV: Delivery Mode and Sequencing Considerations

This blog contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that FEMA Higher Education Program  includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at Delivery Mode and Sequencing considerations for two-year programs.

Delivery Mode and Sequencing Considerations

Student populations vary widely and can range from part- or full-time students, working and non-working individuals, with differing prerequisite needs, course loads, and availability. Consult with your institution’s administration and research division personnel to understand basic student audience data.

Review the ideal timeline for degree completion with a broad approach, such as daytime, evening, or both, and develop course sequencing to support the overarching program goals. Consider balancing general education, discipline, lecture and application/performance-based activities, required, and elective components of the curriculum. Be aware of the concluding program learning experience, such as a capstone project, internship, apprenticeship, and other building blocks needed throughout the program to achieve overall success.

Determining the delivery mode of classroom, online, hybrid, synchronous, poly-synchronous, lecture capture, etc. courses is challenging and often requires knowledge of the institutional distance education environment, skilled online instructors, and course content rich with learning objects, applications, discussions, and the preference of the market audience – students. Other factors to explore include rigor, speed of completion, quality of instruction, quality of technology, and class size.

In addition to all these considerations, be realistic in the length of time it takes to start up and populate a program. Consider a three-year start-up period until class loads begin to stabilize.

Join us next week as we discuss “General Education Curricula” for an Emergency Management 2-Year Academic Program.  In the meantime, please enjoy our one-pager that we created.  It’s designed to help programs get started using the resource we’re discussing! Promote2YearCritInfluencers

2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part III: Course Level Differentiation

This blog contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that FEMA Higher Education Program  includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at Course Level Differentiation considerations for two-year programs.

Course Level Differentiation

Two-year institutions offer lower division courses designated as 100 and 200 levels. Most institutions through the Senate or Curriculum Committee, will have course level standards. The academic industry does offer a few general assumptions and expectations.

Requiring no discipline prerequisites, 100-level courses provide foundational knowledge, address basic concepts, present terminology, and establish the theoretical foundation of a discipline. It is assumed that students will possess sufficient writing ability to compose definitions, paragraphs, and course deliverables, including essays, discussion board postings, and research papers plus possess the reading ability to comprehend college-level material in textbook and supplemental course products.

Requiring 100-level course(s) as prerequisite(s), 200-level courses offer intermediate college-level difficulty within the discipline. It is assumed that students will have completed expository writing (basic level for your institution) or the equivalent and therefore possess general skills such as recognition, reading, appropriate quantitative skills, and a varying degree of fluency in writing and articulateness in expression. It is also assumed that students are acquainted with the basic language, terminology, or methodology of the subject itself and are at the stage of understanding and application where they can progress toward some significant conclusions, experiments, or explorations.

The 200-level courses expect that students possess the basic knowledge and comprehension to progress at a reasonable pace, perform within assignments involving increased reading and comprehension of material, prepare organized papers, and demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the material covered.

Know that institutions and states may have requirements for the numbers of 100- and 200-level courses linked to the type of degree.

Join us next week as we discuss “Delivery Mode and Sequencing” for an Emergency Management 2-Year Academic Program.  In the meantime, please enjoy our one-pager that we created.  It’s designed to help programs get started using the resource we’re discussing!  Promote2YearCritInfluencers

2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part II: Establishing the Foundation

This blog contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that FEMA Higher Education Program  includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at establishing the foundation for two-year programs.

Establish the Foundation

Program success is contingent upon many factors. FEMA research products and educational andragogy play an important role to guide course content, data sources, software products, and analytical tools. Case studies, lessons learned, after-action reports, and service learning components all establish relevance and provide the real-world connection between the classroom and current and future work environment. The program foundation begins with industry engagement, market audience identification, program utility refinement, and degree type determination linking to desired professional hiring standards and workforce needs.

Advisory Committees

Program advisory committees outline local expectations and needs. The process for advisory committee engagement is varied, as some begin with the program justification data collection and synthesis while others are developed after program approval. As program advocates, committee members will assist with the full curriculum development and provide resources in terms of guest speakers, field trips, classroom application activities, internships, and apprenticeship opportunities. Consider the value of including a few internal key stakeholders on your committee.

Market Research

Conduct market feasibility studies and a guiding document review process. Consider reviewing the State Master Plan for Higher Education, county Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Plans, Academic Management Plans, the specific institutional strategic plan, and annual priorities documents.

Program Utility and Degree Type

Determine the spectrum of program utility and degree designation by exploring the academic or career pathway from the perspective of the student, articulation opportunities, and parameters of your institution. Consider whether the program is designed to transfer to a four-year institution or provide immediate workforce ready skills with the option of transferring to another institution mid-career or to a specialty training program or academy.

Two-year degree designations are varied and include Associate of Arts (AA), Associate of Science (AS), and Associate of Applied Science (AAS). The AA and AS degrees frequently carry the designator of transfer programs and are designed as completion points with the goal of transferring to a four-year institution without loss of credit and positioning the student to enroll as a “junior” in the degree progression. The AAS degree positions students with an academic credential designed to meet entry level workforce employment standards.  Explore articulation agreements, often termed 2+2 agreements, and consult the FEMA Higher Education College list for partnering opportunities.

Curriculum Approvals

Familiarize yourself with internal and external approval entities’ processes, documentation, and timelines, including the college curriculum committee, state higher education commission, and regional accreditation body.

Join us next week as we look at Course Level Differentiation considerations.  In the meantime, please enjoy our one-pager that we created.  It’s designed to help programs get started using the resource we’re discussing! Promote2YearCritInfluencers

2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part I: Proving the Value

This post contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that the FEMA Higher Education Program includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at the value of two-year programs. Continue reading

U.S. Border Patrol Recruitment Webinar

 

U.S. Border Patrol Recruitment Webinar
Hosted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection

When: Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Time: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) invites you to participate in the U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) Webinar from 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Wednesday, March 27.

The live webinar will provide an overview of CBP, vacant Border Patrol Agent positions, the application and hiring process, and a panel of experts will be available for Q&A.

The event is free for participants. To register for the event, visit:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/USBPWebinar

Compassion Fatigue

First responders know that the work they do has an impact on their outlook on life. Training for emergency workers includes awareness of and skills for applying mental health first aid. Most experienced responders and caretakers have faith that they will always bounce back after a tough case, call or response. The satisfaction they experience from a job well done and making a difference is great medicine. But if the pressure from performing, witnessing of suffering, and even vicarious distress from hearing about suffering is not balanced with satisfaction, we lose good people to other pursuits.

We are familiar with post traumatic stress that can lead to fixation on events, including experiencing dreams or waking thoughts about loss and suffering that interrupt other tasks. This is normal and can be remedied by getting back to life’s tasks and the support of family and friends. Often, people who survive a traumatic event come out of it better prepared to face challenge in the future. Of course, a person can also be overwhelmed, experiencing symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

You can invite your team members do assess their own risk of compassion fatigue as well as their compassion satisfaction reserves. http://www.compassionfatigue.org/pages/selftest.html. It’s also helpful to ensure that family members of emergency managers and first responders understand the risk. https://www.firerescue1.com/amu/articles/392775018-Increasing-sensitivity-to-firefighter-PTSD/

Green Cross Academy of Traumatology offers training and a list of tools for combating the cost of caring. https://greencross.org/about-gc/standards-of-care-guidelines/  Post it in the break room. You never know who might need some support.