“Great ShakeOut” Earthquake Drill to Occur Today (10/19)

All Marylanders Encouraged to Participate and Practice Earthquake Preparedness

REISTERSTOWN, Md. (October 18, 2017) — The Maryland Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) is asking residents to register and take part in the Great Southeast ShakeOut earthquake drill [today]. Participants will learn proper earthquake preparedness and safety techniques while participating in this nationwide exercise. This year’s ShakeOut is set for Thursday, October 19, 2017 at 10:19 a.m.

“While Maryland experiences earthquakes less often than other hazards, the fact is that they can and do occur in our State,” said Russ Strickland, executive director of MEMA. “Residents should drill for these no-notice events just like they practice fire, severe weather, and other regular drills.”

The ShakeOut drill is free and open to the public. Individuals, families, schools, businesses, government agencies, and many other groups can all participate in tomorrow’s drill.  Those wanting to participate are asked to register by visiting www.shakeout.org. Thousands of Maryland residents have already registered for the 2017 drill.

During the self-led drill, participants practice how to “Drop, Cover, and Hold On.” Endorsed by emergency officials and first responders, the safe response to an earthquake is to:

  • Drop to the ground,
  • Take Cover under a table or desk, and
  • Hold On to it.

For more information about emergency preparedness, please visit our website at mema.maryland.govTwitter feedFacebook page and Instagram.

NOTE TO MEDIA: For information about Maryland participants in the drill, please visit www.shakeout.org/southeast and click on the Maryland icon on the map. Please contact participating organizations directly if you want to do a story about their participation.

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Did you know that MACEM instructors were actively involved in U.S. hurricane response and recovery?

Three adjunct instructors assisted during Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria: Carl Wertman, Dan Cornwell, and James McAuliffe. Mr. Wertman was deployed to Anniston, Alabama, where he headed a small training division providing training relating to Disaster Survivor Assistance and Individual Assistance – engaging survivors on a one-to-one personal basis to assess their needs and get them registered for whatever financial assistance the Federal Emergency Management Agency was able to help with, and to refer them to whole community partners as was appropriate. Mr. Cornwell was deployed to Texas, Florida, and Puerto Rico. Some of his duties included assisting with establishing an ESF 13 Forward Operating Base. He transitioned from Check in/Deputation Coordinator to Remote Demobilization Unit Leader. Mr. McAuliffe was in Florida assisting at the Sanford Police Department.

We would like to acknowledge the contributions made by these MACEM adjunct instructors in the operational environment during the recent devastation of these hurricanes.

Supporting Disaster Survivors in the Disability Community

Author: Linda Mastandrea

Disasters can be devastating for those who are left in the aftermath, but the effects are often amplified for people with disabilities.  As the senior disability integration advisor to FEMA Administrator Brock Long, it is my responsibility to provide direct support and counsel on disability integration needs in support of response and recovery operations.

Continue reading

MACEM Diversity Teaching Resource

Research shows that more diverse environments increase all students’ level of critical thinking, raise levels of their knowledge and awareness, challenge assumptions, and raise levels of their contact connections and communications.  Our one-page diversity teaching resource can serve as a classroom tool for facilitating student learning about diversity and its importance.

Diversity Teaching Aid Feb. 2017

Interested in an Internship or Career in Meteorology?

Weather is a critical planning factor for all emergency management offices.  The mission of Foot’s Forecast is to provide readers with locally-relevant, interactive, scientifically-based forecasts specific to the culture and weather of their area.  Represented by a very diverse team of forecasters, teachers, students, consultants, and weather enthusiasts, Foot’s Forecast uses sound, collaborative science to build understanding of weather reported by local forecasters in your community who interpret global complexities, and relate the impacts to everyday decision-making.

Applications are welcomed from those in the workforce seeking a different venue for their talents, from high school or college up to those in the professional community or if working from home.  Foot’s Forecast offers individuals opportunities to build career experience with others passionate about weather.  Interested in joining their team?  Submit an application today!  Learn more by clicking here.

Why I Serve

By: Valerie Fox
Administrative Associate, Mid-Atlantic Center for Emergency Management

I serve to support, to be a resource, and to make students feel welcome and connected to Frederick Community College as they work to reach their personal and academic goals. My background is not in Emergency Management. Actually, my undergraduate program of study is in social work, and I’ve worked in various support roles during my career. However, ValerieFoxworking at the Mid-Atlantic Center for Emergency Management (MACEM) allows me to offer encouragement and assistance to students. I enjoy helping students as they complete the steps to apply and register for classes. I also enjoy helping them by completing behind the scenes tasks that keep the program running smoothly. It is a pleasure serving the MACEM and learning about all aspects of what emergency managers do. Our students work to prepare for, respond to, recover from, and mitigate against disasters – natural and man-made. The leadership skills they obtain, the networks they build, and the coordination they must carry out before, during, and after an event are truly incredible. I am happy to be a part of it.

How educators can teach about Hurricane Harvey

The New York Times offers resources for teaching and learning about one of the most destructive storms in U.S. history.  Browse lesson plans, tips, and resources to help educators teach their students about Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath.  Teachers can use photos to spark classroom discussions and prompt writing assignments, for example.

The New York Times (free-article access for SmartBrief readers)