2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part IV: Delivery Mode and Sequencing Considerations

This blog contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that FEMA Higher Education Program  includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at Delivery Mode and Sequencing considerations for two-year programs.

Delivery Mode and Sequencing Considerations

Student populations vary widely and can range from part- or full-time students, working and non-working individuals, with differing prerequisite needs, course loads, and availability. Consult with your institution’s administration and research division personnel to understand basic student audience data.

Review the ideal timeline for degree completion with a broad approach, such as daytime, evening, or both, and develop course sequencing to support the overarching program goals. Consider balancing general education, discipline, lecture and application/performance-based activities, required, and elective components of the curriculum. Be aware of the concluding program learning experience, such as a capstone project, internship, apprenticeship, and other building blocks needed throughout the program to achieve overall success.

Determining the delivery mode of classroom, online, hybrid, synchronous, poly-synchronous, lecture capture, etc. courses is challenging and often requires knowledge of the institutional distance education environment, skilled online instructors, and course content rich with learning objects, applications, discussions, and the preference of the market audience – students. Other factors to explore include rigor, speed of completion, quality of instruction, quality of technology, and class size.

In addition to all these considerations, be realistic in the length of time it takes to start up and populate a program. Consider a three-year start-up period until class loads begin to stabilize.

Join us next week as we discuss “General Education Curricula” for an Emergency Management 2-Year Academic Program.  In the meantime, please enjoy our one-pager that we created.  It’s designed to help programs get started using the resource we’re discussing! Promote2YearCritInfluencers

2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part III: Course Level Differentiation

This blog contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that FEMA Higher Education Program  includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at Course Level Differentiation considerations for two-year programs.

Course Level Differentiation

Two-year institutions offer lower division courses designated as 100 and 200 levels. Most institutions through the Senate or Curriculum Committee, will have course level standards. The academic industry does offer a few general assumptions and expectations.

Requiring no discipline prerequisites, 100-level courses provide foundational knowledge, address basic concepts, present terminology, and establish the theoretical foundation of a discipline. It is assumed that students will possess sufficient writing ability to compose definitions, paragraphs, and course deliverables, including essays, discussion board postings, and research papers plus possess the reading ability to comprehend college-level material in textbook and supplemental course products.

Requiring 100-level course(s) as prerequisite(s), 200-level courses offer intermediate college-level difficulty within the discipline. It is assumed that students will have completed expository writing (basic level for your institution) or the equivalent and therefore possess general skills such as recognition, reading, appropriate quantitative skills, and a varying degree of fluency in writing and articulateness in expression. It is also assumed that students are acquainted with the basic language, terminology, or methodology of the subject itself and are at the stage of understanding and application where they can progress toward some significant conclusions, experiments, or explorations.

The 200-level courses expect that students possess the basic knowledge and comprehension to progress at a reasonable pace, perform within assignments involving increased reading and comprehension of material, prepare organized papers, and demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the material covered.

Know that institutions and states may have requirements for the numbers of 100- and 200-level courses linked to the type of degree.

Join us next week as we discuss “Delivery Mode and Sequencing” for an Emergency Management 2-Year Academic Program.  In the meantime, please enjoy our one-pager that we created.  It’s designed to help programs get started using the resource we’re discussing!  Promote2YearCritInfluencers

2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part II: Establishing the Foundation

This blog contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that FEMA Higher Education Program  includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at establishing the foundation for two-year programs.

Establish the Foundation

Program success is contingent upon many factors. FEMA research products and educational andragogy play an important role to guide course content, data sources, software products, and analytical tools. Case studies, lessons learned, after-action reports, and service learning components all establish relevance and provide the real-world connection between the classroom and current and future work environment. The program foundation begins with industry engagement, market audience identification, program utility refinement, and degree type determination linking to desired professional hiring standards and workforce needs.

Advisory Committees

Program advisory committees outline local expectations and needs. The process for advisory committee engagement is varied, as some begin with the program justification data collection and synthesis while others are developed after program approval. As program advocates, committee members will assist with the full curriculum development and provide resources in terms of guest speakers, field trips, classroom application activities, internships, and apprenticeship opportunities. Consider the value of including a few internal key stakeholders on your committee.

Market Research

Conduct market feasibility studies and a guiding document review process. Consider reviewing the State Master Plan for Higher Education, county Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Plans, Academic Management Plans, the specific institutional strategic plan, and annual priorities documents.

Program Utility and Degree Type

Determine the spectrum of program utility and degree designation by exploring the academic or career pathway from the perspective of the student, articulation opportunities, and parameters of your institution. Consider whether the program is designed to transfer to a four-year institution or provide immediate workforce ready skills with the option of transferring to another institution mid-career or to a specialty training program or academy.

Two-year degree designations are varied and include Associate of Arts (AA), Associate of Science (AS), and Associate of Applied Science (AAS). The AA and AS degrees frequently carry the designator of transfer programs and are designed as completion points with the goal of transferring to a four-year institution without loss of credit and positioning the student to enroll as a “junior” in the degree progression. The AAS degree positions students with an academic credential designed to meet entry level workforce employment standards.  Explore articulation agreements, often termed 2+2 agreements, and consult the FEMA Higher Education College list for partnering opportunities.

Curriculum Approvals

Familiarize yourself with internal and external approval entities’ processes, documentation, and timelines, including the college curriculum committee, state higher education commission, and regional accreditation body.

Join us next week as we look at Course Level Differentiation considerations.  In the meantime, please enjoy our one-pager that we created.  It’s designed to help programs get started using the resource we’re discussing! Promote2YearCritInfluencers

2-Year Emergency Management Programs, Part I: Proving the Value

This post contains excerpts from the “Planning Resource for Developing a Two-Year Emergency Management Academic Program” (March 2019) and reflects the collective contribution of the time and expertise of several individuals sharing their dedication to preparing the next generation of emergency management professionals.

Join the national community of two-year emergency management program discussion!

Did you know that the FEMA Higher Education Program includes Special Interest Groups (SIG) to inform the emergency management profession through education and to promote and connect our nation’s academic community members?  This effort includes a SIG entitled Collaboration, Connection, and Commitment of 2-Year Emergency Management Programs.  The next few weeks of the blog will focus on planning resources for two-year programs. This week, let’s look at the value of two-year programs. Continue reading

U.S. Border Patrol Recruitment Webinar

 

U.S. Border Patrol Recruitment Webinar
Hosted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection

When: Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Time: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) invites you to participate in the U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) Webinar from 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Wednesday, March 27.

The live webinar will provide an overview of CBP, vacant Border Patrol Agent positions, the application and hiring process, and a panel of experts will be available for Q&A.

The event is free for participants. To register for the event, visit:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/USBPWebinar

Compassion Fatigue

First responders know that the work they do has an impact on their outlook on life. Training for emergency workers includes awareness of and skills for applying mental health first aid. Most experienced responders and caretakers have faith that they will always bounce back after a tough case, call or response. The satisfaction they experience from a job well done and making a difference is great medicine. But if the pressure from performing, witnessing of suffering, and even vicarious distress from hearing about suffering is not balanced with satisfaction, we lose good people to other pursuits.

We are familiar with post traumatic stress that can lead to fixation on events, including experiencing dreams or waking thoughts about loss and suffering that interrupt other tasks. This is normal and can be remedied by getting back to life’s tasks and the support of family and friends. Often, people who survive a traumatic event come out of it better prepared to face challenge in the future. Of course, a person can also be overwhelmed, experiencing symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

You can invite your team members do assess their own risk of compassion fatigue as well as their compassion satisfaction reserves. http://www.compassionfatigue.org/pages/selftest.html. It’s also helpful to ensure that family members of emergency managers and first responders understand the risk. https://www.firerescue1.com/amu/articles/392775018-Increasing-sensitivity-to-firefighter-PTSD/

Green Cross Academy of Traumatology offers training and a list of tools for combating the cost of caring. https://greencross.org/about-gc/standards-of-care-guidelines/  Post it in the break room. You never know who might need some support.

Kicking off Spring 2019!

FCC Emergency Management students and adjuncts – welcome to the Spring 2019 semester!

You’ll be hearing plenty more from us as classes get underway, but we wanted to start off by showcasing a new accomplishment and a new opportunity:

The Mid-Atlantic Center for Emergency Management (MACEM) is proud to have placed our first two apprentices with host employers! And, as you can see from the picture attached, we have been recognized by Kelly M. Schulz from the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation for our efforts in getting this program established and running.

Dennis Bardelli and Todd Tracey applied to the Maryland Emergency Management Specialist Registered Apprenticeship program and have been apprenticed to the Maryland Emergency Management Agency. They are FCC students – one nearing degree completion, one just beginning – so you may actually see them around, in your class rosters or as your classmates. If you’re so inclined, congratulate them on being our EM apprentice pioneers! Also, if interested in being an apprentice yourself, or know of someone who might be, please contact the MACEM offices (emergmgt@frederick.edu), and we’ll get the process started.

In the meantime, have a great start to your semester, everyone! We’re all looking forward to a new year full of even more successes like these, and we’ll be here to support each of you in making them happen.

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First Generation College Students

The U.S. Department of Education projects that 50% of the college population is comprised of first generation college students.  These students are faced with unique opportunities and challenges.  Leaders emerge in every generation!  Five MACEM staff members were first generation college students and are happy to share their tips for success with you!  Contact us at emergmgt@frederick.edu

https://www.affordablecollegesonline.org/college-resource-center/first-generation-college-students/